Facts of the Week

  • If 90% of US families would breastfeed exclusively for 6 months, the US would save $13 billion per year.

  • 2010 marked the 100th year anniversary of milk banking in the US

  • Exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months equals fewer ear infections and respiratory illnesses--that means fewer missed days of work, fewer health care provider bills, and fewer pharmacy bills. 

  • Breastfeeding reduces the risk of breast and ovarian cancers for moms. 

  • Breastfeeding saves the family budget hundreds of dollars. 

  • Adults who were breastfed as babies often have lower blood pressure and lower cholesterol. 

  • Babies who are breastfed are less likely to become overweight and obese.

  • Within only three months after giving birth, more than two-thirds of breastfeeding mothers in the U.S. have already begun using formula.

  • Breast milk has unparalleled immunological and anti-inflammatory properties that protect against a host of illnesses and diseases.

  • Formula feeding is associated with increases in common childhood infections, such as diarrhea and ear infections. 

  • The risk of acute ear infection is 100% higher among exclusively formula-fed infants than in those who are exclusively breastfed during the first six months. 

  • The risk of sudden infant death syndrome is 56% higher among infants who are never breastfed. 

  • Moms who breastfeed have lower risk for breast and ovarian cancer

  • Breast milk is produced on a demand/supply basis--the more you demand through feeding or expression, the more you produce.

  • Sugars in breast milk protect the intestines from harmful bacteria.

  • Breast milk contains natural laxatives for your baby.

  • Breast milk helps protect your baby from the flu.

  • Breast milk contains fats, proteins, and sugars.

  • Exclusive breastfeeding can help mom burn up to 500 calories per day.

  • Breastfeeding permanently reduces the longterm risk of developing obesity.

  • Breastfed babies are smarter adults.

  • August is National Breastfeeding Month and the first week of August is International Breastfeeding Week.

  • Breastfeeding is the single most effective preventive intervention for preventing deaths of children under the age of 5.

  • Research shows that about 20% of the neonatal deaths (under 1 month) could be prevented if all newborns began breastfeeding during the first hour of life.

  • Children who are breastfed for seven to nine months have on average six points higher IQ than children who are breastfed for less than a month.

  • Breastfeeding reduces a woman's risk of breast and ovarian cancer as well as type 2 diabetes.

  • A fullterm infant’s caloric needs are primarily met by his/her reserves in the first couple of days after delivery.

  • Breastfeeding duration positively influences bone density of the mom. Longterm breastfeeding reduces osteoporosis.

  • Women in the US who return to fulltime work after birth have lower breastfeeding rates than women who return part-time or remain at home.

  • The first federal law to support employed, breastfeeding mothers was passed in early 2010.

  • Employers are required to provide reasonable break time for breastfeeding employees to express milk for 1 year after the child’s birth.

  • Exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life is associated with a decreased risk of excessive weight gain in infancy.

  • Your milk is the only food and drink your baby needs for the first 6 months of life.

  • Breastfed babies are healthy and rarely sick. This means fewer days lost from work for breastfeeding moms.

  • Advice from the expert! Barbara Wilson-Clay is a world renowned Lactation Consultant as well as founding member of MMBA. She shares her expertise with us for National Breastfeeding Month. http://mothersmilkbank.blogspot.com/

  • Did you know that the Office of Women’s Health of the US Department of Health and Human Services is solely devoted to issues of women’s health? They have information on just about anything, but most relevant is their breastfeeding data. Find answers you were looking for, and answers to questions you hadn’t yet thought of!

  • Post-neonatal infant mortality rates in the United States are reduced by 21% in breastfed infants.

  • Research shows that milk donated through a non-profit milk bank carries less risk of contamination than informally shared milk. Find out more.